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Workplace Etiquette: Presentation & Attitude

This guide will help you to understand and thrive in the workplace

Be professional!

Illustration of 12 people representing different professions, including: construction worker, medical professional, flight attendant, business person, police officer, construction worker, firefighter, sports person, chef, judge, teacher, wait staff, artist, defense force, hairdresser, cleaner.

The way you present yourself and the attitude you bring to a workplace can affect how your manager and colleagues perceive you. 

macrovector 2018, Business Vector, freepikviewed 18 March 2021. Copied and communicated under Standard Freepik License.

Do the job!

It may seem obvious but it is important to keep focused and stay on target. Don't be distracted by personal matters, such as unrelated or personal phone calls, social media, and internet searching. 

Dress code / Look like a professional

DRESS CODE /  LOOK LIKE A PROFESSIONAL
Dress codes vary from workplace to workplace. It’s important to dress in a way that represents your company. Some workplaces have uniforms and some may have rules to protect the health and safety of their workers (for example hard hats or steel capped shoes). Have a look at your manager and colleagues and match their level of dress. If in doubt it is better to be slightly more conservative or overdressed, especially if you are just starting.  

Check to see if the company has a dress code policy (remember that dress codes should not discriminate against gender, culture, religious or people with disabilities)

Attitude / Act like a professional

ATTITUDE / ACT LIKE A PROFESSIONAL

DO DON'T
Be positive, confident, and willing to learn. Don't wait for work - ask!
Be polite - say please and thank-you. Don't speak poorly about your manager or colleagues. This includes venting online too.
Introduce yourself to colleagues. A handshake may be appropriate. Don't swear or use profanities - it can make others feel uncomfortable.
Smile  
Make eye contact.  
Offer to help and contribute.  
Ask questions.  

REMEMBER:
You and your colleagues all have your own unique personalities, talents, and learning styles. You all have something to contribute.

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